chiengora piece

30 05 2008

I’m posting a pic of one of the latest chiengora pieces.
It’s Lakota, the wolf, and turkey feathers and part of a turkey beard.
C





spinning from the fleece

27 05 2008





I also wanted to post some pics of the yarn produced from spinning directly from a raw fleece. I don’t pull locks, and tease them, or anything. It’s just drafted directly from the fresh fleece. This has been navajo plied, which you can see in the close-up of the lovely loop-d-loop produced by this method. Yes, this loose, furry, textured yarn is what I was looking for, and I rejoice in every moment I spend producing it.





productive morning

27 05 2008




Last night, I put up the pics of the piece on the Lillstina. What I didn’t tell you was that the alpaca/silk gives a light, drapey fabric if woven properly. Well, the lovely hand-painted, hand-spun is a bit heavy, and unyielding to be THE weft for this piece. Besides, to me it looks a little Southwestern, which just happens not to be ‘me’. So, I spun some other hand-painted roving (yes, I just keep hand-painted rovings laying around) and got a finer yarn, still wool, but we’ll see how it weaves up.
Pictures are posted with this article. You can see the size difference. I may slip by the studio or studios today and see if I have some alpaca or silk that I can dye to go with this warp in case this doesn’t suit the “picky princess” (myself).
Cherri





OH, and my grape arbor in the morning

26 05 2008


One last pic, of my grapevine in the morning.





What’s in your World?

26 05 2008






FINALLY, a few pics. Here are pics of the current work on the Lillstina. It’s a twill derivation from Ann Dixon’s book. The warp is a brown alpaca/silk sett at 24 epi. The piece is about 15″ wide, and the warp is a hand-spun yarn from a hand-painted corriedale roving. I’m not sure it’s the right yarn for this warp, so watch for changes. Other pics are my roses…..yes, I love flowers from private gardens, but you can KEEP almost anything out of a shop.
Then there is this wonderful collaborative piece that Sue Seif is weaving. It’s an alpaca/silk warp, with a chiengora weft. I spun the weft. It’s Sue’s dog’s fur. I was able to spin a fairly fine yarn from him. He has LOTSA personality! Hope you enjoy the pics.
Sorry not to post more often, but Mom is no longer fighting cancer. She died peacefully at home on Tues. having spent time with each of her children, and Dad. My prayer was that God would be merciful in granting her a gentle ‘passing’, and I believe he did.
Now, I’m weaving on 3 looms, and spinning finn lamb, shetland lamb, wolf, and lincoln directly from the whole fleece(no carding, cleaning, breaking into locks, just pull the fleece into my lap, and spin from it. Ain’t life Grand?
See ya soon.
Cherri





What’s in your World?

26 05 2008






FINALLY, a few pics. Here are pics of the current work on the Lillstina. It’s a twill derivation from Ann Dixon’s book. The warp is a brown alpaca/silk sett at 24 epi. The piece is about 15″ wide, and the warp is a hand-spun yarn from a hand-painted corriedale roving. I’m not sure it’s the right yarn for this warp, so watch for changes. Other pics are my roses…..yes, I love flowers from private gardens, but you can KEEP almost anything out of a shop.
Then there is this wonderful collaborative piece that Sue Seif is weaving. It’s an alpaca/silk warp, with a chiengora weft. I spun the weft. It’s Sue’s dog’s fur. I was able to spin a fairly fine yarn from him. He has LOTSA personality! Hope you enjoy the pics.
Sorry not to post more often, but Mom is no longer fighting cancer. She died peacefully at home on Tues. having spent time with each of her children, and Dad. My prayer was that God would be merciful in granting her a gentle ‘passing’, and I believe he did.
Now, I’m weaving on 3 looms, and spinning finn lamb, shetland lamb, wolf, and lincoln directly from the whole fleece(no carding, cleaning, breaking into locks, just pull the fleece into my lap, and spin from it. Ain’t life Grand?
See ya soon.
Cherri





What’s in your World?

26 05 2008






FINALLY, a few pics. Here are pics of the current work on the Lillstina. It’s a twill derivation from Ann Dixon’s book. The warp is a brown alpaca/silk sett at 24 epi. The piece is about 15″ wide, and the warp is a hand-spun yarn from a hand-painted corriedale roving. I’m not sure it’s the right yarn for this warp, so watch for changes. Other pics are my roses…..yes, I love flowers from private gardens, but you can KEEP almost anything out of a shop.
Then there is this wonderful collaborative piece that Sue Seif is weaving. It’s an alpaca/silk warp, with a chiengora weft. I spun the weft. It’s Sue’s dog’s fur. I was able to spin a fairly fine yarn from him. He has LOTSA personality! Hope you enjoy the pics.
Sorry not to post more often, but Mom is no longer fighting cancer. She died peacefully at home on Tues. having spent time with each of her children, and Dad. My prayer was that God would be merciful in granting her a gentle ‘passing’, and I believe he did.
Now, I’m weaving on 3 looms, and spinning finn lamb, shetland lamb, wolf, and lincoln directly from the whole fleece(no carding, cleaning, breaking into locks, just pull the fleece into my lap, and spin from it. Ain’t life Grand?
See ya soon.
Cherri





Book review – the Handweaver’s Pattern Directory

17 05 2008

As many of you know, I was hesitant to appreciate this book. Change does not come easy for some. The book is worthy of a spot on the weaver’s library shelf. It cannot replace “Mastering Weave Structures” by Sharon Alderman, nor Marguerite Davison’s “A Handweaver’s Pattern Book”, which was my fear. Anne Dixon has given the 21st century weaver a naughty little bathroom book for weavers. It’s the book you will sneak away into a quiet corner with to be aroused into weaving something you would otherwise not consider. Why would you do this, you might ask. Because the book shows patterns with pleasant lines, and a variety of colors and fairly simple to understand directions on how to create some of the weaves. There is a broad selection of patterns covered and some hand-manipulated techniques also. The fact that the weaves are in so may different colors, and that some of the ‘standard’ weaves are also shown with ‘color and weave’ effects is food for thought for new weavers and old.
Why will this book not replace Davison’s?
Davison’s book demonstrates a greater diversity of treadling options for twill variations, and she documents many historic weaving patterns like Blooming Leaf, Murphy’s Diaper, and Lee’s Surrender. Hang on to Davison, and enhance your library by purchasing Dixon also.
Why will this book not replace Alerman?
It’s goal seems to be to offer some inspiration, through color, and simple instruction. It is also more of a manual on taking a basic recipe for design, and demonstrating several ways to vary that recipe to create your own designs from the original. Alderman, however delves deeper into the basic structure of a weave. What makes a Huck weave ‘huck’, and how can the weaver come up with her/his own huck designs, without losing the integrity of the fabric. Alderman speaks the language of a seasoned weaver, an architect of fabric. It’s not what Dixon is attempting. Dixon takes the initiated weaver through the basics of how to create the weaves, not what defines the weave and it’s structure.
I like Dixon’s book, and it has it’s place on our shelves. Anne Dixon has done a nice book, and I haven’t, so kudos to her, before I ‘criticize’ the book. Let’s talk about what its limitations are. Although the book can inspire, and instruct you how to weave a variety of patterns and structures, it doesn’t go into any depth explaining the various structures. The explanations are vague, and to my own understanding, some are (ahem) different from what I have been taught. For instance, does Anne say that woolen spun yarns are made from fibers that are carded, which makes the fibers “lie in different directions”? That just isn’t my understanding of carding. “Crammed and Spaced” is variable sett weaving. Let’s just call it what it is, and keep life simple. Anne also shows some of the post-loom treatments, but now how to accomplish them. For instance, how does one hem-stitch? These are minor criticisms, however, as I think the book will tempt me into a private corner for some enchanting daydreams of weaving the beautiful tricolored hucks on p. 166, or the Danish medallions on p.159. Thank you Anne Dixon for this inspiring little book, and the time it must have taken you to put it together. You have my respect. Thank you Lisa H. for giving me the book as a gift.





Book review – the Handweaver’s Pattern Directory

17 05 2008

As many of you know, I was hesitant to appreciate this book. Change does not come easy for some. The book is worthy of a spot on the weaver’s library shelf. It cannot replace “Mastering Weave Structures” by Sharon Alderman, nor Marguerite Davison’s “A Handweaver’s Pattern Book”, which was my fear. Anne Dixon has given the 21st century weaver a naughty little bathroom book for weavers. It’s the book you will sneak away into a quiet corner with to be aroused into weaving something you would otherwise not consider. Why would you do this, you might ask. Because the book shows patterns with pleasant lines, and a variety of colors and fairly simple to understand directions on how to create some of the weaves. There is a broad selection of patterns covered and some hand-manipulated techniques also. The fact that the weaves are in so may different colors, and that some of the ‘standard’ weaves are also shown with ‘color and weave’ effects is food for thought for new weavers and old.
Why will this book not replace Davison’s?
Davison’s book demonstrates a greater diversity of treadling options for twill variations, and she documents many historic weaving patterns like Blooming Leaf, Murphy’s Diaper, and Lee’s Surrender. Hang on to Davison, and enhance your library by purchasing Dixon also.
Why will this book not replace Alerman?
It’s goal seems to be to offer some inspiration, through color, and simple instruction. It is also more of a manual on taking a basic recipe for design, and demonstrating several ways to vary that recipe to create your own designs from the original. Alderman, however delves deeper into the basic structure of a weave. What makes a Huck weave ‘huck’, and how can the weaver come up with her/his own huck designs, without losing the integrity of the fabric. Alderman speaks the language of a seasoned weaver, an architect of fabric. It’s not what Dixon is attempting. Dixon takes the initiated weaver through the basics of how to create the weaves, not what defines the weave and it’s structure.
I like Dixon’s book, and it has it’s place on our shelves. Anne Dixon has done a nice book, and I haven’t, so kudos to her, before I ‘criticize’ the book. Let’s talk about what its limitations are. Although the book can inspire, and instruct you how to weave a variety of patterns and structures, it doesn’t go into any depth explaining the various structures. The explanations are vague, and to my own understanding, some are (ahem) different from what I have been taught. For instance, does Anne say that woolen spun yarns are made from fibers that are carded, which makes the fibers “lie in different directions”? That just isn’t my understanding of carding. “Crammed and Spaced” is variable sett weaving. Let’s just call it what it is, and keep life simple. Anne also shows some of the post-loom treatments, but now how to accomplish them. For instance, how does one hem-stitch? These are minor criticisms, however, as I think the book will tempt me into a private corner for some enchanting daydreams of weaving the beautiful tricolored hucks on p. 166, or the Danish medallions on p.159. Thank you Anne Dixon for this inspiring little book, and the time it must have taken you to put it together. You have my respect. Thank you Lisa H. for giving me the book as a gift.





Book review – the Handweaver’s Pattern Directory

17 05 2008

As many of you know, I was hesitant to appreciate this book. Change does not come easy for some. The book is worthy of a spot on the weaver’s library shelf. It cannot replace “Mastering Weave Structures” by Sharon Alderman, nor Marguerite Davison’s “A Handweaver’s Pattern Book”, which was my fear. Anne Dixon has given the 21st century weaver a naughty little bathroom book for weavers. It’s the book you will sneak away into a quiet corner with to be aroused into weaving something you would otherwise not consider. Why would you do this, you might ask. Because the book shows patterns with pleasant lines, and a variety of colors and fairly simple to understand directions on how to create some of the weaves. There is a broad selection of patterns covered and some hand-manipulated techniques also. The fact that the weaves are in so may different colors, and that some of the ‘standard’ weaves are also shown with ‘color and weave’ effects is food for thought for new weavers and old.
Why will this book not replace Davison’s?
Davison’s book demonstrates a greater diversity of treadling options for twill variations, and she documents many historic weaving patterns like Blooming Leaf, Murphy’s Diaper, and Lee’s Surrender. Hang on to Davison, and enhance your library by purchasing Dixon also.
Why will this book not replace Alerman?
It’s goal seems to be to offer some inspiration, through color, and simple instruction. It is also more of a manual on taking a basic recipe for design, and demonstrating several ways to vary that recipe to create your own designs from the original. Alderman, however delves deeper into the basic structure of a weave. What makes a Huck weave ‘huck’, and how can the weaver come up with her/his own huck designs, without losing the integrity of the fabric. Alderman speaks the language of a seasoned weaver, an architect of fabric. It’s not what Dixon is attempting. Dixon takes the initiated weaver through the basics of how to create the weaves, not what defines the weave and it’s structure.
I like Dixon’s book, and it has it’s place on our shelves. Anne Dixon has done a nice book, and I haven’t, so kudos to her, before I ‘criticize’ the book. Let’s talk about what its limitations are. Although the book can inspire, and instruct you how to weave a variety of patterns and structures, it doesn’t go into any depth explaining the various structures. The explanations are vague, and to my own understanding, some are (ahem) different from what I have been taught. For instance, does Anne say that woolen spun yarns are made from fibers that are carded, which makes the fibers “lie in different directions”? That just isn’t my understanding of carding. “Crammed and Spaced” is variable sett weaving. Let’s just call it what it is, and keep life simple. Anne also shows some of the post-loom treatments, but now how to accomplish them. For instance, how does one hem-stitch? These are minor criticisms, however, as I think the book will tempt me into a private corner for some enchanting daydreams of weaving the beautiful tricolored hucks on p. 166, or the Danish medallions on p.159. Thank you Anne Dixon for this inspiring little book, and the time it must have taken you to put it together. You have my respect. Thank you Lisa H. for giving me the book as a gift.