small loom weaving class – thurs. nights

9 09 2009

I’m beginning a small looms weaving class on Thursday nights from 6:30 – 9:00.

The first session will meet from 9/24 – 10/15.  It’s 10 instructional hours.

This is in the far west end of Richmond, VA.  Contact me if you are interested.  It’s rigid heddle looms, table looms, frame looms, and tapestry looms.

I’ve also posted a couple of wetfelting-by-hand classes. hat-felting, and rug felting, and a weekday and weeknight sewing class.  HOpe this helps some of you that I had to put on the waiting list.  visit the ‘contact me’ page for information on how to reach me if you have questions.  Much love.

Cherri

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Notes on Spinning

6 09 2008

Last night, I taught a spinning class in Charlottesville.  I just wanted to say what a lovely group it is, and to post some reminders, for you, and for me.

2. Work on the continuous drafting. Watch to insure you aren’t releasing your measuring hand resulting in pinch and push techniques.

3.  Keep the draft zone under tension.  Allowing a ‘loose’ draft zone can result in a very woolen looking yarn.  Tension keeps the fibers parallel, giving a smoother surface  to your yarn.

4.  Find harmony with your wheel.  If you aren’t comfortable with your wheel, or your sitting position, height of orifice, etc, your yarn will reflect this.

5. When spinning a single, it should spin back on itself when allowed to drape.  It isn’t spun too tightly just because it does.  As a matter of fact, look at what it looks like when it plies back on itself.  If it looks like a yarn that you want, then you are probably putting enough twist in it.

6.  Don’t consider your homework WORK.  If you enjoy spinning, your homework should be about 20% of what you spin this week.  Spin 20 min, and if you are frustrated, take a break and come back to it.  Almost without fail, beginning students say that walking away from their spinning and returning an hour or more later makes for an improvement in their yarn.

homework was to spin a bobbin of singles, and to then navajo ply it.

7Sorry, Make that #1. Have Fun!  It will reflect in your yarn.

For me, a reminder of what some of you want to do in this class:

1. Work with flax, bamboo, and camel

2. Charkha

3. Wool combs and worsted spinning

4.  Saxony wheel

5.  Plying

6.  Learn to asses the quality of yarn produced, and analyze problems/issues

If I haven’t covered everything, or if you want something added, please e-mail me

maidensweaver at earthlink dot net   or leave a comment on this blog.

Cherri

Hope everyone made it home safely. And I’ll see you next week.





spinning from the fleece

27 05 2008





I also wanted to post some pics of the yarn produced from spinning directly from a raw fleece. I don’t pull locks, and tease them, or anything. It’s just drafted directly from the fresh fleece. This has been navajo plied, which you can see in the close-up of the lovely loop-d-loop produced by this method. Yes, this loose, furry, textured yarn is what I was looking for, and I rejoice in every moment I spend producing it.