Photos of the rigid heddle workshop

18 11 2013

DSC_0004 DSC_0005 DSC_0003 DSC_0002 DSC_0001Just putting up a few pics of the work the students did Saturday at the Rigid heddle workshop. This was a privately booked workshop for 2 friends. They were such fun folks and their works is lovely.

The folding loom is a Schacht Flip and the non-folding loom is an Ashford Rigid Heddle loom.

The ladies had taken a dye workshop the day before with Barbara Gentry of Stony Mountain Fibers and used some of those beautiful yarns in these weavings. Barbara is a very knowledgable fiber artist with a great retail selection on Hammocks Gap Rd just north of Charlottesville. I’ve long enjoyed her kind, creative personality, and she has provided supplies for my classes. I also think that one of my early looms came from her file box of people selling used looms.

Anyway, the workshop was fun and as usual, I’m humbled by the beautiful work my students have created.

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Weaving lessons available in Goochland, Schuyler, VA and Buckeye, WV (near Cass).

13 10 2012

I’m now set up with looms and spinning wheels in 3 locations to teach. If you are interested in learning to weave or spin, scribble out an e-mail and let’s get something booked. Lessons are $50/hr. Count on 2 hours for the first lesson. If you are working on a rigid heddle loom, that might be the full session you need. If you are on a floor loom, it’s a more time-consuming process. Spinners should count on a series of 4 one hour lessons and homework in between. Things you might want to bear in mind as you consider classes:

1. The process is the same whether you do a bookmark or a blanket, so start out with a bookmark, because what you really need to learn first is how to dress the loom. A bookmark might take you 1.5 hours to set up, where a blanket might take you 15 hours of instructional time. That’s a $ difference of about $675.00! I know it’s difficult to shell out $100 to weave a bookmark, but you aren’t paying for the bookmark, you are paying for Knowledge and help in becoming a weaver. It’s an investment in your future as a weaver/craftsman/woman.

2. To begin with, inexpensive yarns, like RedHeart are great to learn on. Move on to finer yarns as your skills improve.

3. If you book a lesson, show up for it on time.

4. Your best improvement will come from practice, so plan on doing homework. 

Hope to hear from you soon! maidensweaver at earthlink dot net





Notes on Spinning

6 09 2008

Last night, I taught a spinning class in Charlottesville.  I just wanted to say what a lovely group it is, and to post some reminders, for you, and for me.

2. Work on the continuous drafting. Watch to insure you aren’t releasing your measuring hand resulting in pinch and push techniques.

3.  Keep the draft zone under tension.  Allowing a ‘loose’ draft zone can result in a very woolen looking yarn.  Tension keeps the fibers parallel, giving a smoother surface  to your yarn.

4.  Find harmony with your wheel.  If you aren’t comfortable with your wheel, or your sitting position, height of orifice, etc, your yarn will reflect this.

5. When spinning a single, it should spin back on itself when allowed to drape.  It isn’t spun too tightly just because it does.  As a matter of fact, look at what it looks like when it plies back on itself.  If it looks like a yarn that you want, then you are probably putting enough twist in it.

6.  Don’t consider your homework WORK.  If you enjoy spinning, your homework should be about 20% of what you spin this week.  Spin 20 min, and if you are frustrated, take a break and come back to it.  Almost without fail, beginning students say that walking away from their spinning and returning an hour or more later makes for an improvement in their yarn.

homework was to spin a bobbin of singles, and to then navajo ply it.

7Sorry, Make that #1. Have Fun!  It will reflect in your yarn.

For me, a reminder of what some of you want to do in this class:

1. Work with flax, bamboo, and camel

2. Charkha

3. Wool combs and worsted spinning

4.  Saxony wheel

5.  Plying

6.  Learn to asses the quality of yarn produced, and analyze problems/issues

If I haven’t covered everything, or if you want something added, please e-mail me

maidensweaver at earthlink dot net   or leave a comment on this blog.

Cherri

Hope everyone made it home safely. And I’ll see you next week.