Weaving lessons

2 12 2012

I’m able to offer weaving lessons at Schuyler, VA, Buckeye, WV and Goochland, VA now. Whether you are interested in learning to weave tapestry, or rigid heddle, or floor loom I can teach you. Cost is $50/hr. Last weekend, I taught a wet-felting workshop. It was a private workshop, so I didn’t advertise. We did wall-hangings. We had a great time. Two weeks prior to that, I taught a spinning workshop. Some of these I teach through the Virginia Museum’s Partners in the Arts program. I’ll be looking for opportunities like that in West Virginia. If you are interested in lessons, or booking a private workshop for you and some friends, just shoot me an e-mail. Private lessons are $50/hr, but workshops are priced on a per person basis. I do gift certificates, so you can book a workshop and give gift certificates to up to 3 friends and we can felt or spin together (for a total of 4 participants). 

Currently, I’m working on 4 commissions for the same client. 2 ladies scarves, a man’s scarf and a 4th scarf that is a bit like an ascot. All are handspun chiengora and all will be hand-woven as well. I’ve worked for this client before. She has 2 beautiful collies that are therapy dogs. I love spinning their fiber and they are such sweeties, too. 

My workspace in Goochland is my home; in Schuyler, I have a free-standing studio at the house, and in West Virginia there is a separate studio also. Right now, we are looking for a good heat source for the free-standing studios. Until we get the heat sources worked out, I’m teaching inside the house at each location. 

One last item that keeps me busy (too busy to blog lately, anyway) is that I am an artist-in-residence in the Richmond Public Schools. This year, I have two schools that I work with and my target age group is 4th grade. I’m loving JEB Stuart and the principal, Mrs. Moore is the most supportive principal I’ve met. She has booked every single class to come and spend time with me, the visiting artist. Awesome!  I am felting, spinning and weaving with the 4th graders. They are a loquacious group and i adore them. 

For now, that’s all. I’ll try to post pics very soon.

 

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Weaving lessons available in Goochland, Schuyler, VA and Buckeye, WV (near Cass).

13 10 2012

I’m now set up with looms and spinning wheels in 3 locations to teach. If you are interested in learning to weave or spin, scribble out an e-mail and let’s get something booked. Lessons are $50/hr. Count on 2 hours for the first lesson. If you are working on a rigid heddle loom, that might be the full session you need. If you are on a floor loom, it’s a more time-consuming process. Spinners should count on a series of 4 one hour lessons and homework in between. Things you might want to bear in mind as you consider classes:

1. The process is the same whether you do a bookmark or a blanket, so start out with a bookmark, because what you really need to learn first is how to dress the loom. A bookmark might take you 1.5 hours to set up, where a blanket might take you 15 hours of instructional time. That’s a $ difference of about $675.00! I know it’s difficult to shell out $100 to weave a bookmark, but you aren’t paying for the bookmark, you are paying for Knowledge and help in becoming a weaver. It’s an investment in your future as a weaver/craftsman/woman.

2. To begin with, inexpensive yarns, like RedHeart are great to learn on. Move on to finer yarns as your skills improve.

3. If you book a lesson, show up for it on time.

4. Your best improvement will come from practice, so plan on doing homework. 

Hope to hear from you soon! maidensweaver at earthlink dot net





Honestly, my favorite rigid heddle loom is……

29 12 2011

If you’ve read the rigid heddle loom review, you may have used it to help you find the right loom for you, based on your criteria. If your criteria is cost alone, you bought the Beka, If you are specifically interested in using your rigid heddle loom for tapestry, hopefully, you got the Penelope. If you are traveling, and want a compact loom, you probably got the flip, or the Kromski folding loom. Whatever your specific criteria or expectations are from the loom, the review offered some guidance.

Through the years that I’ve had product reviews up, people have drawn from the reviews their own conclusions as to what my preferences were. So, tonight, I’m going to tell you what I choose to weave on, and why. For tapestry that I will take with me,  I like a rigid heddle loom, and use the Penelope II. It doesn’t have the ability to use the rigid heddle as a beater, and that’s fine with me. It limits the loom in it’s use for continuous, pattern weaving, but it’s just right for me for tapestry. I can warp it with a nice long warp also. Because I use an upright tapestry floor loom, the upright feature of the Penelope is a natural choice.

Of the horizontal, rigid heddle looms, I choose the Ashfords. I have two of them. One is narrow and one is wider. Both have stands. I may even have 3, couldn’t tell you for sure, tonight. I like the heft of the loom in my hands,  like the stand for the Ashford, and I like the colored rigid heddle. The thing I don’t love about it, is the dumb plastic things that connect the warp rod and the warp beam, as well as the front “apron” rod and the cloth beam. Oh well, nothing is perfect, and I often choose favorites that aren’t the most popular looms or items on other people’s list. There you have it;0D

This isn’t to say that these are the best looms. They are the looms that harmonize with my weaving self. A natural “fit” with my weaving quietude. Though I weave professionally, I’m not a production weaver. My work is on a commission basis, because I prefer the peace of weaving in conjunction with my natural rhythms, rather than working on a pushed schedule. Unfortunately, I am most inspired to work by a looming deadline.  My commissions are generally woven on floor looms, but I’ve sold pieces off the rigid heddle loom for respectable money. Don’t undersell yourself, because you are then underselling all weavers and all handcraftsmen.

What’s your favorite loom, and why?  You can respond by e-mail, or in the comments section. I really want to know, and think other folks do too.

Weave joyfully.

C.





Learn to Spin Yarn from the Spinning Wheel

13 12 2011

I’m organizing a spinning class for January 2012. It will be a beginners spinning class. If you are looking for a spinning class, or workshop, please let me know what date/s work for you. A series of 4 classes over a month is best for most students, as you benefit most from at-home work between lessons. Cost for a 4 class series is $140.00 and will provide 10 hours of instruction, if you attend all classes. Make-up classes are not free-of-cost. If you miss a class, you may purchase a 1 hour make-up lesson for $40.00.

Students interested should contact me so we can organize the class on a date that will work for you!

Spinning wheels are available for rent to students who do not have their own. REntal fee: $50/month.  Spinning wheels are only rented to current students and only during the dates of their class session.  Students may bring their own fiber, or pay materials fee for fiber to be used in class.





Returning to Richmond and am available for lessons!

17 10 2011

I’m heading back to Richmond today, but won’t arrive until tomorrow night. Upon my return, there are a couple of commissions waiting, and a couple of weaving students. I am available for private lessons, but you need to have your own loom, or be willing to work on a table-top/tapestry or rigid heddle loom for the beginning, as I’ve rented the other looms out for now.

I’m also available for spinning lessons. Spinning wheels are available for your use in the spinning classes. Private lessons are $40/hr. and I try to accomodate your schedule, but don’t offer private lessons on weekends.  If you have 3 or more people interested in a workshop, however, we can usually find an available weekend for a 6 hour workshop.

The commissions are for a chiengora tapestry, that I’ve been working on for a year. Tapestries take me a while. And a chiengora throw from a beautiful collie. Both commissions are both handspun and hand-woven.

Looking forward to working with you in the studio, which is now located at my home in Goochland.





Wet-felting workshop was wonderful

12 12 2010

Yesterday was the latest wet-felting workshop. It was privately booked, with the understanding that I would guarantee the class , but if additional students were interested, I could register 2 others.  We held the class with 2. Although there were numerous inquiries about the class, everyone wanted to know when the “next” one is. The answer is generally the same….. whenever you book one, and then I will advertise to add to it. I book my classes based on demand.  If a student is available, and wants to book for 2  people, I’ll guarantee the class, and attempt to increase registration.That way, when the weekend is reserved on my calendar, I definitely have a class, and you are guaranteed a class, rather than receiving a cancellation at the last minute.

Anyway, here are some pics of the class. We had fun, and the hats were precious. We made hats, and embellishments.

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Change of location on the Learn to Weave in a Weekend

7 01 2009

Well, there wasn’t sufficient registration for the class at the art center, so it’s at my own studio on Stillman Rd, in Richmond’s lovely West End.  There will be 3-4 of us on floor looms.  That uses all my floor looms, but if you have your own table loom or table top tapestry loom, please feel free to e-mail me up to the last minute to be added to the class.  Fee is $100.00 for the weekend + materials fee.  We will meet from 6:30 – 9 on friday evening, 10-4 on Saturday, and 1-4 on Sunday.

Hope to see you over the weekend.