Photos of the rigid heddle workshop

18 11 2013

DSC_0004 DSC_0005 DSC_0003 DSC_0002 DSC_0001Just putting up a few pics of the work the students did Saturday at the Rigid heddle workshop. This was a privately booked workshop for 2 friends. They were such fun folks and their works is lovely.

The folding loom is a Schacht Flip and the non-folding loom is an Ashford Rigid Heddle loom.

The ladies had taken a dye workshop the day before with Barbara Gentry of Stony Mountain Fibers and used some of those beautiful yarns in these weavings. Barbara is a very knowledgable fiber artist with a great retail selection on Hammocks Gap Rd just north of Charlottesville. I’ve long enjoyed her kind, creative personality, and she has provided supplies for my classes. I also think that one of my early looms came from her file box of people selling used looms.

Anyway, the workshop was fun and as usual, I’m humbled by the beautiful work my students have created.

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One opening remains in the Rigid Heddle Weaving Workshop

11 01 2012

I have one spot left in the workshop on Saturday, 1/21/2012.

It’s a one day workshop on learning to set-up and weave on rigid heddle looms.

9 am – 4 pm, Goochland County, Va. Lunch is provided

Cost: $100.00

Call me: 804.556.9875

or Paypal the class fee to maidensweaver@earthlink.net

 





Honestly, my favorite rigid heddle loom is……

29 12 2011

If you’ve read the rigid heddle loom review, you may have used it to help you find the right loom for you, based on your criteria. If your criteria is cost alone, you bought the Beka, If you are specifically interested in using your rigid heddle loom for tapestry, hopefully, you got the Penelope. If you are traveling, and want a compact loom, you probably got the flip, or the Kromski folding loom. Whatever your specific criteria or expectations are from the loom, the review offered some guidance.

Through the years that I’ve had product reviews up, people have drawn from the reviews their own conclusions as to what my preferences were. So, tonight, I’m going to tell you what I choose to weave on, and why. For tapestry that I will take with me,  I like a rigid heddle loom, and use the Penelope II. It doesn’t have the ability to use the rigid heddle as a beater, and that’s fine with me. It limits the loom in it’s use for continuous, pattern weaving, but it’s just right for me for tapestry. I can warp it with a nice long warp also. Because I use an upright tapestry floor loom, the upright feature of the Penelope is a natural choice.

Of the horizontal, rigid heddle looms, I choose the Ashfords. I have two of them. One is narrow and one is wider. Both have stands. I may even have 3, couldn’t tell you for sure, tonight. I like the heft of the loom in my hands,  like the stand for the Ashford, and I like the colored rigid heddle. The thing I don’t love about it, is the dumb plastic things that connect the warp rod and the warp beam, as well as the front “apron” rod and the cloth beam. Oh well, nothing is perfect, and I often choose favorites that aren’t the most popular looms or items on other people’s list. There you have it;0D

This isn’t to say that these are the best looms. They are the looms that harmonize with my weaving self. A natural “fit” with my weaving quietude. Though I weave professionally, I’m not a production weaver. My work is on a commission basis, because I prefer the peace of weaving in conjunction with my natural rhythms, rather than working on a pushed schedule. Unfortunately, I am most inspired to work by a looming deadline.  My commissions are generally woven on floor looms, but I’ve sold pieces off the rigid heddle loom for respectable money. Don’t undersell yourself, because you are then underselling all weavers and all handcraftsmen.

What’s your favorite loom, and why?  You can respond by e-mail, or in the comments section. I really want to know, and think other folks do too.

Weave joyfully.

C.





Returning to Richmond and am available for lessons!

17 10 2011

I’m heading back to Richmond today, but won’t arrive until tomorrow night. Upon my return, there are a couple of commissions waiting, and a couple of weaving students. I am available for private lessons, but you need to have your own loom, or be willing to work on a table-top/tapestry or rigid heddle loom for the beginning, as I’ve rented the other looms out for now.

I’m also available for spinning lessons. Spinning wheels are available for your use in the spinning classes. Private lessons are $40/hr. and I try to accomodate your schedule, but don’t offer private lessons on weekends.  If you have 3 or more people interested in a workshop, however, we can usually find an available weekend for a 6 hour workshop.

The commissions are for a chiengora tapestry, that I’ve been working on for a year. Tapestries take me a while. And a chiengora throw from a beautiful collie. Both commissions are both handspun and hand-woven.

Looking forward to working with you in the studio, which is now located at my home in Goochland.





Rigid heddle workshop and pics of work for the show

17 03 2009

Here are a few pics of the Rigid heddle workshop from Mon.  We are going to finish the workshop up tomorrow.

Also included are pictures that I included with the contract for the show this fall.  I love the textures, and colors.

We currently have 2-3 new students in the studio, and have one waiting.  We are adding a Wed. morning weaving class also.

Cherri

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